Fishing QuestionsCategory: Deep Drop Fishing FAQHow to deep drop for swordfish?
Xasofond AS asked 1 month ago
How to make a deep drop for swordfish?

6 Answers
Alex – ProFisherman Staff answered 3 weeks ago
There are a few things to keep in mind when deep drop fishing for swordfish. First, you’ll need to use heavier tackle than you would for shallow water fishing. Second, you’ll need to adjust your bait presentation to get the bait down to the fish. And finally, you’ll need to be patient – swordfish can be notoriously finicky eaters.

Here are some tips for deep drop swordfishing:

Heavier Tackle: When fishing in deeper water, you’ll need to use heavier tackle than usual. This means beefier lines and stronger hooks. fluorocarbon lines in the 60-80 lb range are a good choice, as are extra-strong Ganflies designed for trolling or bottom fishing.

Adjust Your Bait Presentation: To get your bait down to the fish, you’ll need to adjust your presentation. This usually means using a heavier sinker than you would in shallower water. A good rule of thumb is to use a sinker that is equal to the weight of your rod – so if you’re fishing with a 60 lb rod, use a 60 lb sinker.

Be Patient: Swordfish can be notoriously finicky eaters. They often take their time when feeding, so it’s important to be patient when fishing for them. If you don’t get a bite after a few minutes, move your bait around and try again. There’s no need to rush – when you finally hook into a swordfish, it will be worth the wait.

Deep drop fishing for swordfish can be a bit of a challenge, but it’s definitely worth it. With these tips in mind, you’ll be able to put yourself in the best possible position to score a big one. Good luck out there!

Bernard answered 3 weeks ago
Before you deep drop for swordfish, it’s important to understand their preferred habitat and diet. Swordfish are migratory fish that prefer deep, open water. They are opportunistic feeders that primarily eat squid, but they will also take advantage of any other bait in the area.

To catch swordfish, you’ll need to use a weighted line and a large baited hook. The weight should be heavy enough so that the line sinks quickly to the bottom. A good starting point is to use a weight that’s equal to 5-10 times the weight of your rod and reel. When fishing in open water, you’ll want to cast your line as far from the boat as possible and let it sink all the way to the bottom.

Once your line is at the bottom, you’ll need to be patient and wait for a bite. Swordfish are known for being finicky eaters, so it might take a while before you get a bite. If you don’t get a bite after a few minutes, try moving your bait around and see if that attracts any fish.

The swordfish is very strong and it is not easy to get it out. The fisherman needs to have a special belt and a rod stop. Often fishermen pull it alternately out of the water.

Deep drop fishing for swordfish can be a bit of a challenge, but it’s definitely worth it. With these tips in mind, you’ll be able to put yourself in the best possible position to score a big one. Good luck out there!

Carlos answered 3 weeks ago
Deep dropping for swordfish is a bit different than your typical bottom fishing methods. The key is to get your bait down to where the swordfish are hanging out, which is usually in deep water. For this reason, you’ll need to use a heavier setup than usual, with a stout rod and reel combo that can handle heavy weights. You’ll also need a heavier weight on your line, anywhere from 10-20 pounds should do the trick.

Now for the bait itself, live squid or cut bait will work just fine. If you’re using live squid, rig it up on a circle hook so that it doesn’t come off when the swordfish strikes. And finally, let out enough line so that your bait is sitting on the bottom. You don’t want your bait floating around in the water column, as this will just scare off the fish.

Be patient when fishing for swordfish, as they are known to be finicky eaters. If you don’t get a bite after a few minutes, try moving your bait around and see if that attracts any fish. There’s no need to rush – when you finally hook into a swordfish, it will be worth the wait.

Deep drop fishing for swordfish can be a bit of a challenge, but it’s definitely worth it. With these tips in mind, you’ll be able to put yourself in the best possible position to score a big one. Good luck out there!

David answered 3 weeks ago
To deep drop for swordfish, you’ll need a sturdy boat with a deep well and plenty of fishing gear. You’ll also need to find some good swordfishing grounds, and make sure you’re familiar with the regulations in that area.

Once you’re set-up, use a large sinker to anchor your line to the bottom, and then slowly let out the line until you feel a bite. When you do, set the hook quickly and reel in your catch!

Martin Staff answered 3 weeks ago
When deep dropping for swordfish, you’ll need to use a heavy weight on your line (at least 100 pounds) and a large bait (e.g., a live bluefish or tuna). You should also use a stout rod and reel with plenty of line capacity.

To find swordfish, look for areas where the bottom falls away quickly into deep water. You can also find them near structures, such as shipwrecks and coral reefs. Be sure to keep an eye out for feeding fish, as this is often the best indication that swordfish are nearby.

When you spot a fish, slowly lower your bait towards the bottom. Keep in mind that swordfish like their food fresh, so don’t let your bait sit on the bottom for too long. If you don’t get a bite after a few minutes, try moving your bait around and see if that attracts any fish.

Deep drop fishing for swordfish can be a bit of a challenge, but it’s definitely worth it. With these tips in mind, you’ll be able to put yourself in the best possible position to score a big one. Good luck out there!

Wilson answered 3 weeks ago
There are a few things to keep in mind when deep drop fishing for swordfish. First, you’ll need to use heavier tackle than you would for shallower fishing. Second, you’ll need to pay attention to the currents and plan your descent accordingly. And finally, you’ll want to use bait that is known to attract swordfish.

For tackle, you’ll want to use a heavy-duty rod and reel combo rated for at least 100 pounds of line. You’ll also need a stout leader, about 400-600 pounds breaking strength. As for line, monofilament or braided lines are both fine but make sure it’s sufficiently strong.

When it comes to currents, the key is to descend at the same speed as the current. This can be tricky, but if you descend too quickly you’ll scare off the fish. If you descend too slowly, however, your bait will just sit on the bottom and won’t be very effective.

As for bait, live squid is always a good choice. You can also use cut bait, but it’s not quite as effective. If you’re using live squid, rig it up on a circle hook so that it doesn’t come off when the swordfish strikes. And finally, let out enough line so that your bait is sitting on the bottom. You don’t want your bait floating around in the water column, as this will just scare off the fish.

Be patient when fishing for swordfish, as they are known to be finicky eaters. If you don’t get a bite after a few minutes, try moving your bait around and see if that attracts any fish. There’s no need to rush – when you finally hook into a swordfish, it will be worth the wait.