Fishing QuestionsCategory: Downrigger FAQHow to troll deep water without downriggers?
Umisit asked 5 months ago

6 Answers
Alex – ProFisherman Staff answered 4 months ago
There are a few different ways to troll deep water without using downriggers. One way is to use a dipsy diver, which is a weighted torpedo-shaped device that you attach to your line. When you reel it in, it creates resistance and pulls the line downward.

You can also use a downrigger release, which is a device that allows you to lower your bait or lure down to the desired depth and then release it so that it can travel back up to the surface.

Finally, you can also try using weight belts or lead weights to get your line deeper into the water. Whichever method you choose, be sure to experiment until you find what works best for you. Good luck!

Bernard answered 4 months ago
You can troll deep water without downriggers by using a lead core line and a planer board.

Leadcore line is a type of fishing line that has a heavy lead core running through the center. This weight helps to pull your bait down to deeper depths. To use it, tie the lead core line to your main fishing line and then attach a leader wire to the end of the lead-core line.

Next, tie your bait onto the end of the leader wire. Finally, attach a planer board to the opposite end of the leader wire. The planer board will help to keep your bait from swimming too close to the boat and will allow you to troll at deeper depths without having to use downriggers.

Carlos answered 4 months ago
There are a few ways to troll deep water without downriggers. One way is to use a weighted trolling sinker or a torpedo-style lead weight to get your bait down deep.

Another way is to use an inline lead weight, also known as a “banana weight”, which is a long, cylindrical weight that you can thread onto your line below the bait. This type of weight will help you keep your bait in position and prevent it from swimming away from the target area.

Finally, you can also use a keel sinker, which is a weighted sinker with a flat bottom that will help keep your bait stable in the water column. Experiment with different weights and techniques until you find what works best for you. Good luck!

David answered 4 months ago
There are a few different ways to troll deep water without downriggers. One way is to use a weighted bank sinker or torpedo sinker and tie it off to the end of your line. You can also use a trolling sinker, which is a lead weight that slides up and down your line.

Another way to troll deep water is by using a daisy chain, which is a series of small weights that are attached to your line. And finally, you can use an inline depth finder to help you track your lure at deeper depths.

Martin Staff answered 4 months ago
Trolling for deep water fish without downriggers can be challenging, but there are a few strategies that can be effective. One is to use a heavy sinker and troll very slowly, keeping your bait near the bottom.

Another is to use a lighter sinker and troll faster, keeping your bait higher in the water column. yet another option is to use a structure-type lure such as a bottom bouncer or jellyfish lure.

Whatever strategy you choose, it’s important to experiment and find what works best in your particular situation. Pay close attention to your fish finder and adjust your depth accordingly. And always remember – have fun out there!

Wilson answered 4 months ago
Downriggers are devices that are used to lower and raise bait or lure rigs. They typically consist of a heavyweight, mounted on a line, that is lowered into the water. The downrigger allows the fisherman to Troll at deliberate depths, depths not achievable by simply letting out line.

When properly employed, downriggers can be precision tools in your fishing arsenal allowing you to stay in constant contact with fish-holding bottom structures and schools of fish suspended anywhere in the water column.

Now, there are other ways of achieving similar effects without the use of downriggers and they include the use of planer boards and dipsey diver-style sinking lines rigged behind the boat. In each case, these alternative methods all share one commonality and that is they all get your bait or lure away from the boat to where the fish are.

So, whether you choose to use downriggers, planer boards, or dipsey divers (or a combination of all three), remember it’s not about the equipment you use but rather how you employ them. As with most fishing techniques, experimentation is key to success.