Fishing QuestionsCategory: Fishing Line FAQWhat fishing line sinks?
Talioench X asked 4 months ago

6 Answers
Bernard answered 3 months ago
There are a number of different types of sinking lines, each of which is designed for a specific purpose. Some lines are made to sink quickly, while others sink more slowly. Some lines are designed for deep-water fishing, while others are meant for shallower waters.

Many fishermen prefer sinking lines because they allow them to get their bait down to where the fish are hiding. However, it is important to use the right type of line for the type of fishing you’re doing, or you may end up with a lot of line in the water and not much fishing to show for it.

Sinking lines are designed to sink below the surface of the water. This type of line is often used in fly fishing because it can be used to reach fish that are hiding beneath the surface.

If you’re just starting out, it’s a good idea to talk to a local fishing guide or shop owner to find out what type of line is best for the type of fishing you want to do. They will be able to give you specific advice on which lines are best for the area you’re fishing in.

Wilson answered 3 months ago
There are a few types of fishing lines that can sink. Some monofilament lines are designed to sink, while others can be made to sink by adding a small amount of lead weight. Fluorocarbon lines also have the ability to sink, and some anglers prefer them because they are less visible in the water. Finally, there are also sinking fly lines that can be used when fishing for trout or salmon in moving water.

Carlos answered 3 months ago
There are a few different types of fishing lines that can sink, including monofilament and braided fishing lines. Some sinking fly fishing lines are also available.

The type of line that sinks will depend on the weight and material of the line. Heavier, lead-filled lines will sink faster than lighter lines made from plastic or other materials.

Alex – ProFisherman Staff answered 3 months ago
There are a few different types of fishing lines that sink, including sink-tip lines and full sinking lines. Sink-tip lines have a floating portion near the head with a sinking portion towards the end of the line. Full sinking lines are completely covered in a material that causes them to sink. Each type of line has its own benefits and drawbacks, so it’s important to choose the right one for the job at hand.

Sink-tip lines are popular because they offer a good compromise between buoyancy and sink rate. The floating portion helps keep the lure or bait closer to the surface, while the sinking portion ensures that it gets down to where the fish are feeding. However, because only part of the line sinks, it can be difficult to control where your lure or bait is going.

Full sinking lines are ideal for fishing in deep water or for getting your lure or bait down to the bottom quickly. However, because the entire line sinks, it can be hard to control where it goes and you may need to use a heavier weight to keep it in place.

Ultimately, the type of fishing line you use is up to you and what you’re trying to accomplish. There are benefits and drawbacks to each type, so it’s important to choose the one that will work best for your needs.

David answered 3 months ago
There are several types of fishing lines that can sink, depending on the material and weight. The most common sinking fishing lines are made from the lead core, braided line, or metal. Lead core fishing line is the heaviest and will sink the fastest.

Whereas metal fishing lines are lighter but still offer good sinking capabilities. Lastly, braided fishing lines sink slower than lead core or metal because of their water repellent properties.

Martin Staff answered 3 months ago
There are a variety of fishing lines that sink, including fluorocarbon, monofilament, and braided lines. While each type of line has its own unique characteristics, they all share the common ability to sink quickly and effectively.

This makes them ideal for a variety of fishing scenarios, including targeting fish that are holding close to the bottom. No matter what type of line you choose, be sure to select a version that is designed for the specific type of fishing you plan on doing.